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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 121-125

A prospective study on various factors influencing post-operative wound infection in emergency surgeries


1 Resident, Department of General Surgery, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College & Research Institute, SBV University, Pondicherry 607402, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College & Research Institute, SBV University, Pondicherry 607402, India
3 Professor, Department of General Surgery, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College & Research Institute, SBV University, Pondicherry 607402, India

Correspondence Address:
R Kalaivani
Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College & Research Institute, SBV University, Pondicherry 607402
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsic.2015.11.003

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Background: The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) is approximately 1–3% for elective surgery and more for emergency surgeries. Apart from patient endogenous factors, the role of external risk factors in the pathogenesis of SSI is well recognized. However, among the various measures to prevent SSI, only some are based on strong evidence, and there is insufficient evidence to show whether one method is superior to any other. Therefore, this study was carried out to find out the various factors causing post-operative wound infection, the commonly associated microorganisms, and antibiotic sensitivity and resistance pattern. Methods: The study was conducted in tertiary care hospital, Pondicherry between September 2012 and September 2014. All the patients who underwent emergency surgeries in the Department of General Surgery were included in the study. An elaborative clinical study of post-operative wound infection was conducted. The suture site was inspected for any sign of infection starting from the second post-operative day till discharge from hospital. Wound swabs were collected and sent for aerobic culture and sensitivity. Results: In this study, open appendectomy was the most common surgery that was performed on an emergency basis. Anemia followed by hypoalbuminemia were the two important comorbid conditions. The rate of infection for clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty wound were 16.88%, 38%, and 20% respectively. Conclusion: SSI occupies a significant proportion among various hospital-acquired infections. SSI not only prolongs the hospitalization but also markedly increases the expenditure and morbidity.


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