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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 30-34

Higher rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage amongst hospitalised patients in rural South India


1 Undergraduate Medical Students, Faculty of Medicine, Government Theni Medical College, The Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical University, Theni, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Government Theni Medical College, The Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical University, Theni, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Ramalingam Sekar
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Government Theni Medical College, The Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical University, Theni - 625 512, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpsic.jpsic_3_17

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Introduction: The carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is often considered an important issue in terms of infection control. The present study is aimed to determine the carriage rate of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) amongst hospitalised patients in comparison to community population and healthcare workers in rural South India. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted amongst adult participants from three different groups – healthy community population, healthcare worker (staff nurses) and hospitalised patient. Finger, nose and throat of all study participants were examined for the carriage of S. aureus and MRSA by microbiological culture, identification and susceptibility testing to oxacillin. Results: The carriage rate of S. aureus was 47.2', 55.6' and 77.8', respectively, in the community, hospitalised and healthcare workers; similarly MRSA carriers were 16.6', 47.2' and 22.2', respectively. S. aureus carriage rate was higher amongst healthcare workers, and MRSA carrier rate was higher amongst hospitalised patients. The MRSA carriage rate amongst hospitalised patients was 7-fold higher than the community population and 2-fold higher than the healthcare workers. Conclusion: Hospitalised patients tend to carry the higher rate of MRSA and are at high risk of developing invasive infections. Hence, screening/decolonization for MRSA at the time of hospitalisation and prudent infection control measures is necessary to combat this pathogen.


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